Encollegement

Tips & rants re: college applications, college planning, college access, college survival, college college college! Parents? And financial aid.

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msulibrary:

Montana Hall, 1898

Amazing!
I love when you go on a campus tour and they’re like, “And this building is the original college,” and they literally mean “This building used to house every single thing and person in the college.”

msulibrary:

Montana Hall, 1898

Amazing!

I love when you go on a campus tour and they’re like, “And this building is the original college,” and they literally mean “This building used to house every single thing and person in the college.”

(via collegi8)

Saint Mary's University frosh chant cheers underage sex - Nova Scotia - CBC News →

A sexist orientation week “tradition” for freshmen on a Canadian campus — cheering for rape and mocking consent — gets outed via Instagram.

This article includes the following detail:

The Labour Day incident occurred just days after senior school administrators and police met with student union officials and orientation organizers stressing the importance of discouraging sexism and sexual assault during frosh week.

And this one adds:

The St. Mary’s University Students’ Association cut funding to an event called ConsentFest last year, which focused on issues surrounding sexual consent.

Know Your IX, everyone. Don’t forget.

(Anyone know of an equivalent resource for Canadian laws?)

What college is worth

Had some thoughts while reading last week’s installment in the Washington Post’s “The Tuition Is Too Damn High” series: “Why College Is Still Worth It.”

The argument he gives is mostly a financial one, which I have mixed feelings about as a motivator. The earning vs. learning debate is really personal, but even aside from that, talking only about money gets people mad. (IMHO, “Kids don’t need college any more” is pretty much the same kind of shit rich college kids sayPeter Thiel himself being the case in point.)

Tuition is tough. Applying yourself to work is good. Making plans that are original for yourself is good, too. But encouraging students to lemming off a cliff is wrong, whether you’re pushing “college” or pushing “work.” (And actually, with the emphasis on mentorship as well as research, the goals of the anti-college fellowship seem as if they are aiming to teach you a lot of the same things as… college.)

I actually really support critiques of college outcomes, and it is a myth that every person has a fun, successful time at it. That’s a really important thing to me. (The Post article also discusses the “marginal” student, if this interests you.) But I don’t believe in telling someone their ambitions are wrong.

It doesn’t matter what inspires you to set high goals and learn to work well! It matters that you care about doing those things.

For a great many students, demanding higher wages with their degree is not a perk but a mission. College degrees can keep kids out of poverty. There is luck involved in that success, but the alternative tools are not more reliable, unless a billionaire is handing you a fellowship.

There’s a bunch of stats in this article to tell you why education is still considered objectively valuable, but I also think a lot about the social value in building something out of the common clay. It gives you cred. Work is good, but life is good too — and when you’re 18, college is a ticket to take yourself somewhere to try and have one. Every adult I know is who they are because of whatever path they took to or around higher education. The decision does change you! Use the tools in your toolbox.

sixoxox:

So… There’s this Target commercial that shows the reactions of kids getting accepted to college.

And… Well basically I cry every time…

Agh so happy to see this on my dash againnn.

(Source: youpeoplegivemearash, via theprospectblog)

columbiajournies:

Found this little place when we were trying to find Wall Street…I’ll be at the real one in about 7 hours :)

New favorite thing: freshman bloggers who have just moved here to NYC to start college. So much <3!Also, fyeah history.

columbiajournies:

Found this little place when we were trying to find Wall Street…I’ll be at the real one in about 7 hours :)

New favorite thing: freshman bloggers who have just moved here to NYC to start college. So much <3!

Also, fyeah history.

Keep talking about it: Know Your IX

Talking about the campus rape stories in the news doesn’t come close to touching on all of the ways people are affected by rape and the institutions that house it. But it would be wrong to say it’s too much to get into, I can’t even start!

One of the things you will love the most about going to college is that your college lives on its own planet. It’s one of the most exhilarating parts of the enthusiasm you have for it when you go, and your campus community can help keep you sane there.

But you must take care. Your new college planet, it might be further from home than you think. You could, perhaps, find yourself in one of the ivoriest towers in all the land, where they can’t say the r-word. It can be surreal.

In case not every single one of you has read, saved, shared this link already:

imageKNOWYOURIX.ORG

Nutshell: Title IX and the Clery Act protect the rights of student sexual assault victims. And your school should follow the rules.

This site should be read, by everyone: laws are clearly presented, action items are offered, and step-by-steps help you deal. Thank you to the awesome people behind it.

There are, I learned, a lot of campus-specific blogs on Tumblr focused on sexual safety, survivor support, and activism. Please tell me if you know more! Here are the ones I found:

Don’t forget that you have the right to ask your planet what universe it is living in.

theatlantic:

Do Unpaid Internships Lead to Jobs? Not for College Students

The results were even worse when it came to salary. Among students who found jobs, former unpaid interns were actually offered less money than those with no internship experience.

Read more. 

Your daily disillusionment!

I like the way this report is presented, but I’m curious to probe more demographic information. The only bits shown here are majors and GPA, which makes sense as the supposedly egalitarian measure of college students. But of course, people see you as more than that: race, gender, background — not to mention what school that GPA comes from. There’s a lot of ways to slice this.

Anyway, what’s up with Psychology? That’s the only field in the chart where unpaid interns got more jobs than paid ones. Seems like some more break-down by industry would help too.

(via ratemyprofessors)

Just a Barnard Baby: Boys. →

barnardbaby:

  • Dudes exist here
  • Dudes exist in NYC
  • I have friends who are guys
  • I’ve met men I like and bros I really dislike
  • I’ve been cat-called and harassed on the streets by dudes
  • I’ve gotten into arguments about institutionalized oppression with guys
  • I’ve dropped some of them like it’s hot because…

Dig the way she handles this subject. Plus the advice can apply to girls on all campuses, not just women’s colleges.

datanews:

With today’s release of NYC high school graduation data, we decided to graph the graduation rates for every school in the city, for 8 years, on one chart. Check out the interactive version here.

DATA NERDING. I love graduation rates, because you can read the impact of so many different factors in them.
Not on the chart, these numbers in the article are particularly interesting:

The percentage of students deemed ready for college and careers is just half of the overall graduation rate, about 35 percent statewide; among black and Hispanic students the percentages were far lower (12.5 percent and 15.7 percent, respectively). In New York City, only 21.9 percent of all students were college and career ready, an increase of 1.2 percentage points since last year. [&#8230;]
The state defines college and career readiness by looking at how many students earn at least 75 percent on their English Regents and 80 percent on their math Regents.

This is of course of specific interest to those in contact with NYC&#8217;s (many!) schools, but some of these lines hold a rather universal dramatic appeal. I wish the post explored some of those data dips.

datanews:

With today’s release of NYC high school graduation data, we decided to graph the graduation rates for every school in the city, for 8 years, on one chart. Check out the interactive version here.

DATA NERDING. I love graduation rates, because you can read the impact of so many different factors in them.

Not on the chart, these numbers in the article are particularly interesting:

The percentage of students deemed ready for college and careers is just half of the overall graduation rate, about 35 percent statewide; among black and Hispanic students the percentages were far lower (12.5 percent and 15.7 percent, respectively). In New York City, only 21.9 percent of all students were college and career ready, an increase of 1.2 percentage points since last year. […]

The state defines college and career readiness by looking at how many students earn at least 75 percent on their English Regents and 80 percent on their math Regents.

This is of course of specific interest to those in contact with NYC’s (many!) schools, but some of these lines hold a rather universal dramatic appeal. I wish the post explored some of those data dips.

science vs. romance

image

I read the NYT’s Sunday article, "Japan’s ‘Science Women’ Seek an Identity", and it reminded me of a few other recent items about gender and science in universities, so I wanted to collect them.

The Times’s article focuses on the social stigma in Japan that judges girls who “reject” humanities by choosing a technical major. Specifically, that it is understood that if you out yourself as a science student, "Men think you are not cute."

Pick up your jaw, okay?

At first it seemed sort of funny to me that the Times was reporting on the perceived cuteness of Japanese women (ON IT!). But this isn’t, of course, the point. Personal perception drives decisionmaking, a lot, both your own and that determining how others treat you. Mainly, this article is about good changes taking place in Japan’s college recruitment efforts, but even those come out of this very icky swamp:

“Many universities cannot fill their capacity because youth population is declining,” Ms. Kawano said. “So they are turning to the population segment that was previously not thought to be their customers: women.”

.

Well, of course, we face the same issue here in the U.S. (though our numbers are currently better). A couple weeks ago I read this post, a quote about STEM recruitment with a really good hook:

The way we try to recruit girls into STEM fields is all wrong. We typically compare them to some great woman or someone that has gone before them.

I like where this statement goes, because it’s a reminder to tell girls they aren’t Barbie dolls. The most helpful way to inspire them isn’t to tell them to compare themselves to each other and emulate someone famous. Those are the things we want girls to stop doing. We need them to be themselves, and believe they have that freedom.

.

Anyway, all I really mean to say is, if there’s anyone who didn’t read Phyllis Richman’s "Answering Harvard’s question about my personal life, 52 years later" — a response to an admissions letter she received in 1961, asking her to explain how she expected to have a city planning career while being married — please go do that.

I think being admitted to Harvard would have propelled my career path to the level of my husband’s… . Your letter shows just how much Harvard — not to mention my husband, our families and even myself — didn’t give my career the respect it deserved when I was just starting out.

It’s okay. She fixed it for herself.